Cofely District Energy Awarded Coventry Contract; UK Must Massively Increase District Heat, Report Says

October 22, 2012 By Jessica Lyons Hardcastle

Cofely District Energy has won a 25-year contract to operate the Coventry City Council’s heat network, and a new report says district heating must play a “massive role” if the UK is to reach its carbon reduction and energy targets.

Cofely will operate Heatline, buying heat from a waste-to-energy plant and transporting it via a 6.6 km network of underground pipes to customers.

The energy will then be sold back to the City Council and other customers at a competitive rate, the company says.

Cofely says Heatline will provide customers lower energy costs in addition to carbon tax savings. It says the system will save thousands of pounds in heating pubic buildings and save 2,000 tons of carbon per annum.

Cofely’s capital investment will be £3 million, Cogeneration and On-Site Power Production reports. Heatline has also received a £2.3 million investment from the government’s Homes and Communities Agency for installation of the infrastructure.

In Phase I, Cofely will supply heating and hot water to a range of council buildings and the Coventry Cathedral (pictured). The company says Phase I should be operational by September 2013.

The second phase will deliver heat to social housing, other residential developments and local businesses.

To meet its goals of reducing GHGs by up to 34 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050, compared to 1990 levels, a report by energy consultants Delta Energy & Environment says the UK must expand district heating from serving about 1 percent of homes currently to about 30 percent by 2050, according to Cogeneration and On-Site Power Production

A study by the Institute for Public Policy Research published over the summer said manufacturers need more incentives to invest in low-carbon and energy efficient technologies if the UK is going to meet its low-carbon economy goals, Environmental Leader reports.

A study published this month by the Northeast/Midwest Institute said older US cities face significant obstacles in installing district energy and combined heat and power systems.


Leave a reply