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GM Stamping Plant Switches Lights To LED

Paul Nastu

LED lights for GMGeneral Motors converted an entire stamping plant in its Lordstown assembly in Ohio to LED lights, switching 815,000 square feet in one sweep and reducing energy consumption by 80 percent. Alled Lighting Systems supplied its High Bays lights with ALLINK, an integrated, wireless control system.

GM switched more than 1,300 metal halide fixtures of 1,000 watts and a couple hundred more of 400 watts each to about 1,200 LED lights of 90 to 360 watts each. GM did not have to install new control systems since the new lights came with their own wireless control system, which it said was one reason why it went with this supplier.

The wireless controls also connect with the building’s management system and tap its Ethernet network. With wireless controls, the plant also can customize and schedule specific levels of light in particular task areas, depending on the tasks being performed.

Alled’s affiliate SSL Energy Solutions spent two years testing the quality, efficiency and durability of the lights before the actual installation. SSL was also the project manager for the duration of the conversion from August through November of 2012.

GM will work with SSL to continue converting other areas of the 6 million square feet Lordstown facility to LED. Beginning this month, two other plants at the facility will switch out their 400 watt fixtures to LED.

The automaker is changing lights at other facilities as well. GM expects to save more than $800,000 a year on electricity at its Spring Hill Manufacturing complex in Tennessee by upgrading to high-efficiency lighting and wireless controls. Last November, it announced that the lighting upgrade project included replacing nearly 4,500 fixtures with high-efficiency fluorescent lights made by Light Corporation and installing a wireless control system by Kanepi Innovations.



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