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NanoLight Produces ‘Most Energy-Efficient LED’

January 22, 2013 By Jessica Lyons Hardcastle

The NanoLight uses only 12 watts of electricity and generates more than 1,600 lumens, equivalent to a 100W incandescent lightbulb, according to the company, which says its signature product is the most energy-efficient bulb on the market.

While there are plenty of 20-60W equivalent LED light bulbs, 75-100W equivalents are rare, the company says.

Unlike other LED light bulbs, NanoLight says its product emulates the classic lightbulb and directs light in all directions. This allows for light to be distributed evenly, and provide the ultimate lighting experience.

The company also says the NanoLight works in harsh temperatures, achieves full brightness as soon as it’s turned on — unlike compact fluorescent lights — and its performance is not affected by frequently turning on and off.

The LED is available in two models:

The 10W NanoLight (75W-equivalent) is available in black or white and has a brightness of 1,200 lumens. The company estimates its yearly energy cost at $1.20, based on three hours/day, 11 cents/KWh. It has an expected 25 to 30 year life, and its efficiency is 120 lumens per watt. The company lists its light appearance at 4000K (neutral white with a bit of warmth).

The second model — which NanoLight calls the most energy-efficient light bulb available — is the 12W NanoLight (100W-equivalent). It also comes in black or white, has a brightness of 1,600 lumens and an estimated yearly energy cost of $1.41. It has the same life expectancy and light appearance as its 10W counterpart, but with greater efficiency: 133 lumens per watt.

The bulb design fixes the problem of “energy droop,” whereby efforts to increase a bulb’s electrical output also cause it to be less energy-efficient, according to SmartPlanet.

 

 



3 comments on “NanoLight Produces ‘Most Energy-Efficient LED’

  1. The efficacy on these lights is phenomenal, however 4000k is starting to be way too blue for me from a color rendering point of view. I would like to see an LED like this in the 2700k-3000k .

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